Thursday, February 25, 2010

WARNING: Contagious Peace


Be on the lookout for symptoms of inner peace. The hearts of a great many have already been exposed to inner peace and it is possible that people everywhere could come down with it in epidemic proportions. This could pose a serious threat to what has, up to now, been a fairly stable condition of conflict in the world.

Some signs and symptoms of inner peace:

A tendency to think and act spontaneously rather than on fears based on past experiences.
An unmistakable ability to enjoy each moment.
A loss of interest in judging other people.
A loss of interest in judging self.
A loss of interest in interpreting the actions of others.
A loss of interest in conflict.
A loss of the ability to worry. (This is a very serious symptom.)
Frequent, overwhelming episodes of appreciation.
Contented feelings of connectedness with others and nature.
Frequent attacks of smiling.
An increasing tendency to let things happen rather than make them happen.
An increased susceptibility to the love extended by others as well as the uncontrollable urge to extend it.


WARNING:

If you have some or all of the above symptoms, please be advised that your condition of inner peace may be so far advanced as to not be curable. If you are exposed to anyone exhibiting any of these symptoms, remain exposed only at your own risk.


--Saksia Davis

Saturday, February 06, 2010

Happy Sami Day

 
Happy Sami Day. Thanks to "Stranger in a Strange Land" for piquing my interest in my family's Sami roots.  Laestadianism's history is inseparable from the history of the Sami people. Someday when I have more time, I would like to investigate how ancient Sami culture is still expressed (and repressed) among its descendants.

This is my daughter last year at her elementary school's Cultural Festival. She chose a colorful outfit to go with the flag and was very proud to carry it.  

How about you? What is your connection to Sami history or culture?

Thursday, February 04, 2010

Sami Hymn Singing

Someone sent me a link to this video, along with the following caption. The video won't embed, but here's the link. Enjoy!

http://www1.nrk.no/nett-tv/klipp/484409

These are a couple of Sami ladies from Kautokeino, Norway, singing a hymn I think we all recognize. However, I don't remember the name of this in English. They are singing in the Sami language. Apparently both women are well-known joikers in their community. Joiking and singing are very different and joikers often sing deeper in the throat. This way of singing influences Laestadians today. I can hear they sing much Laestadians from congregations that continue to sing their hymns a cappella in the USA, typically IALC and OALC. These women are part of the Lyngen branch of Laestadians known only in Norway. However, the Lyngen branch have many different splits, often along ethnic lines: Sami, Kven (Finnish-speaking) and Norwegian-speaking (though these congregants are a ethnic mix of Kven, Sami, and Norwegians).

A Fresh Look

Big thanks to Tomte for keeping this site ticking and for the new coat of paint. Write a comment below if you would like to see something added, of if anything isn't working for you.